Pickled Bigfoot Eggs

We've got a section of deviled egg recipes here, including our fool-proof method for steaming eggs so they don't shred when you peel them. But I love these pickled deviled eggs 1,000 times more than the regular kind because 1) the texture of the egg white gets chewier in the brine, 2) the yolk tastes creamier next to the pickle, and 3) Das Bigfoot crushes it. You can also mash this recipe into an egg salad and serve on toast. Oh em gee.

12 large eggs
1 ½ c rice vinegar
6 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
2 ½ tbsp packed light brown sugar
1 ½ tbsp Crop Duster
1/2 tsp peppercorns
1 large red or white onion, sliced thin (I used white but red would be better)
1 cup mayonnaise
2 tsp Das Bigfoot or to taste

Click here for our steamed egg recipe. While you're steaming or hard boiling the eggs, combine the rice vinegar, garlic, brown sugar, Crop Duster and peppercorns in a sauce pan with 1/2 cup water. Bring to a boil, add the onions and remove from heat. Skin the eggs and plunged into an ice bath. Place 1/2 the onions in a heat-proof container, place the eggs on top, cover with the brine and chill for 12-24 hours. Remove the eggs and save the brine. Slice the eggs in half, and smash the yolks in a bowl with mayo, 1 tbsp brine, and Das Bigfoot. Taste the filling for salt and pepper. Pipe the yolk into the egg white halves, sprinkle with Das Bigfoot and top with sliced onions. 

Adapted from Melissa Clark

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Dusted Pot Roast

Because winter!

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Adapted from Brett Anderson in The New York Times
Serves 6-8

INGREDIENTS
3 pound boneless beef chuck roast
Crop Duster
Feather Duster
3 tablespoons canola oil
4 tablespoons butter
2 medium onions, chopped
4 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
3 stalks celery, cut into 2-inch pieces
10 small yellow potatoes cut in quarters
8 oz white button mushrooms, chopped
2 parsnips, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 head garlic, top cut off to expose cloves
¾ cup tomato paste
2 bay leaves
3 sprigs rosemary
1 ½ cups red wine
4 cups beef broth

INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat oven to 340 degrees. Season meat generously with Crop Duster. On the stove top, heat oil in a large Dutch oven, or other heavy roasting pan with a lid, over medium-high heat. Sear the meat until a dark crust forms, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Remove meat to a plate.

Reduce heat to medium and add butter to the pan. Melt the butter and add the whole head of garlic and vegetables, stirring frequently and scraping the bottom of the pot, until the vegetables start to color, 8 to 10 minutes.

Add tomato paste and cook, stirring frequently, until it darkens slightly, about 5 minutes.

Add bay leaves, rosemary and wine and cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid is reduced to a thick gravy consistency, 5 to 7 minutes. Add 1 tbsp Feather Duster. Taste for seasoning.

Return meat to the pot. Add broth, then cover the pot and transfer to the oven. Cook for 2 hours and 20 minutes.

Let roast sit at room temperature for at least 10 minutes. Remove meat to a cutting board to slice. Discard bay leaves and rosemary stems. Squeeze any garlic cloves remaining in their skins into the stew and discard the skins. You could also remove the veggies and whisk in flour to the gravy to thicken it and return the veggies to the pot (I did that).

Serve slices of meat in shallow bowls along with the vegetables and a generous amount of cooking liquid ladled over top.

Compound Butter

Lisa at Photosynthesis in Ames turned us on to compound butter on Thanksgiving. She served it with Parker House rolls…seriously, I thought it was the best part of the meal. It turns out all salts AND sugars make great compound butters! Use them on baked goods, steak, veggies, toast, you name it!

These aren’t ours, but don’t they look lovely?

These aren’t ours, but don’t they look lovely?

INGREDIENTS
1 stick of butter
2 tsp of Saltlickers
Parchment or waxed paper if you’re want a log shape
Fresh herbs if you wish

Let the butter soften at room temp then stir in the spice (and herbs). Place the butter on a sheet of parchment or waxed paper, roll into a log, and chill for at least two hours.

Spiced Nilla Wafer Cookies

This recipe works with Das Bigfoot, Bangla-dash or Roxy Taco. Bangla-dash wafers call for one more tsp of spice than Das Bigfoot or Roxy wafers. You can use regular-sized Nilla wafers, but we like the minis. Reduced fat Nilla wafers work great too—they’re harder and they absorb the oil and spice well. I first butter tried on these, but oil’s better!

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INGREDIENTS
1 11 oz box Nilla Wafers
1 tbsp canola oil
2 tsp Roxy Taco OR
2 tsp Roxy Taco OR
3 tsp Bangla-dash

INSTRUCTIONS
Preheat oven to 300.

Spread the wafers on a foil-covered cookie sheet. Pour the oil over them and toss with spice, 1/2 tsp at a time. Use your hands to make sure everything’s evenly distributed. Bake for 5 minutes. They will crisp when they cool.

Roxy Taco Chili-ful Chili: Pork or Veg

Last weekend, we chili-ed our faces off, starting at the Stanhope Locker's first chili cook-off with pulled pork chili (left), then at Wheatsfield's Member Appreciation Day with roasted butternut sguash black bean chili (right, it's vegan!), served with Cy Salt Oyster crackers. Both batches had the same base, starting with 4 oz of dried chilis—leave the seeds in if you like heat—covered in 4 cups of boiling water and soaked for 1/2 hour. You can find dried chilis in the Mexican aisle of your grocery store. We used New Mexico chiles, but poblano, ancho or hatch would also work great and be fairly mild for heat. Both styles were delicious. Serves 12, adapted from Cook’s Illustrated.

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INGREDIENTS
4 oz dried chilies: New Mexico, poblano, ancho or hatch
stemmed, seeded and torn to pieces
4 cups boiling water
2 tbsp honey
2 tbsp white vinegar
5 peeled garlic cloves
1 tbsp Roxy Taco*
1/2 tbsp Cy Salt or to taste*
1 tbsp olive oil
28 oz whole peeled tomatoes
2 15 oz cans of your fave chili beans:
    For the squash we used black beans,
    pintos for the pork

For pork chili: 5 lbs boneless pork shoulder

For squash chili: 5 lbs butternut squash
(about 3 medium or 2 large) peeled, seeded and cubed

For both: Crop Duster spice, Grilla Gorilla, or GGX

INSTRUCTIONS
For pork chili:
 Sprinkle your pork shoulder with Crop Duster spice, Grilla Gorilla, or GGX, wrap in plastic wrap and let it sit in the refrigerator for at least 3 hours, up to 24. Preheat the oven to 300. Brown the shoulder in olive oil in a big Dutch oven or oven-safe pot. Cook in the oven for about 4 hours--till it’s falling apart. Remove, let it cool, and chop it short. This was my mistake for the Stanhope chili: I left the strands of pork too long and ropey, like a pulled pork sandwich.

For squash chili: Preheat the oven to 425. Toss your squash with a splash of olive oil and sprinkle with Crop Duster spice, Grilla Gorilla, or GGX. Roast for about 45 minutes, tossing after about 30 minutes.

For the chili: Pour the boiling water over the chilies and soak for 30 minutes. Drain off half the soaking liquid and save. Place the chilies, honey, vinegar, garlic, Roxy and Cy in a food processor and blend till you have a smooth paste. 

Heat the oil on medium high in a big Dutch oven or heavy pot. Pour in the chile paste and stir for 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and their juice. Drain and rinse the beans and add them to the pot. If your chili’s looking dry, add some of the bean liquid, chile soaking liquid, or some dark Mexican beer.

Stir the meat or squash into the chili and cook on low for 1 hour, or in a crockpot on low for 4 hours. Taste for seasoning.

*My squash chili took twice as much spice as the meat version.

Serve with Cy Salt oyster crackers: 1 tbsp Cy Salt + 1/4 cup olive oil. Bake at 250 for 5 minutes.

Lisa's First Place State Fair Potato Salad

Frenchowa* Potato Salad**
Makes 4-6 servings

¾ pound small white boiling potatoes
¾ pound small red boiling potatoes
½ pound trimmed green beans
½ red onion, sliced
2 tablespoons dry white wine
2 tablespoons chicken stock
3 tablespoons Champagne vinegar
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon Crop Duster
2 teaspoons French Tickler
8 tablespoons lemon olive oil
1/4 cup minced chives
2 tablespoons minced flat-leaf parsley
2 tablespoons julienned fresh basil leaves

Boil potatoes in salted water until just cooked through. Blanch green beans for 3-4
minutes. When potatoes are still warm, but into bite-sized pieces. Toss with the wine,
chicken stock and Crop Duster. Make dressing by whisking together olive oil, vinegar
and mustard. Add to potatoes, beans, and onion. Toss with chives, parsley, and French
Tickler. Serve at room temperature, si’l vous please.

*Collin asked "Is 'Frenchowa' a real thing?" "No."

**Adapted from Ina Garten

Not the real potato salad. Lisa's was much prettier, served in a heart-shaped bowl.

Not the real potato salad. Lisa's was much prettier, served in a heart-shaped bowl.